ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

(Source: daughtersofdig, via proletarianinstinct)

POEM FOR MY 43RD BIRTHDAY by CHARLES BUKOWSKI

truckstopstruckstop:

To end up alone
in a tomb of a room
without cigarettes
or wine—
just a lightbulb
and a potbelly,
grayhaired,
and glad to have
the room.
…in the morning
they’re out there
making money:
judges, carpenters,
plumbers, doctors,
newsboys, policemen,
barbers, carwashers,
dentists, florists,
waitresses, cooks,
cabdrivers…
and you turn over
to your left side
to get the sun
on your back
and out
of your eyes.

tune-shehums said: I recently saw your post on the sugar skull makeup tutorial Promise did. I never really saw the makeup as offensive, but obviously I can't really say anything on it cause I'm not latinx. Now my question. I've been wanting a sugar skull tattoo for a while now. I've always loved the detail and bold colors. Is it offensive to get that tattoo since I'm not latinx?

white-girl-brown-world:

thisisnotlatinx:

Disclaimer: I’m Dominican and Brazilian and have no affiliation to Mexico.

Also that post was a submission that a Mexican person submitted to voice their feelings on an issue that was important to them, which is actually quite common. If a post isn’t signed by a mod it’s usually a submission so yeah with that said…

DDLM is about paying respects to passed loved ones so the sugar skulls have become associated with the day and the reason may people feel offended by non Mexicans wearing sugar skull make up (and tats) is because obviously death is a very touch subject and it’s kindof disrespectful when you see something that’s part of your culture being used as a fun dress up thing.

Do any Mexicans want to chime in?

-m

If you’re not Mexican please stay the fuck away from Mexican culture.

I don’t care how beautiful you think it is. How much you’ve researched or if you’re 25k in debt from studying Mexican culture at college. Or if you had a spiritual experience after every single cousin I have jizzed on your face.

It’s not yours. DDLM is sacred. It survived (for the most part) imperialism for Christ’s sake. It’s meant to honor OUR dead OUR loved ones. Not to decorate your God damn anything. Do you have any idea what my people had to endure to keep this alive? To keep in going? What Mexican parents to american kids have to go through to have their kids not feel shame about their bodies and our culture and to see it as something to be respected?

All the work they’ve done and do and you just want to roll up and be a part of it? You don’t have respect. You, the asker, can’t even correctly classify this holiday as Mexican you say Latinx. Do you even know the history of these skulls you find so beautiful?

Unless unless you’ve been invited to participate in an event by a Mexican or are buying Mexican goods from Mexicans or appreciating the culture from a far (listening to music, watching a Mexican film, going to a Mexican art show, learning about it etc) stay away.

Learn about your own people. See beauty in your culture.

Stay away from mine.

"Can we have a no hat rule at the wedding? I’m so sick of seeing my cousin in that fedora."

unhappyhipsters:

Overheard by: gooodnesssgracious

(Heard something funny? Tag with #UnhappyHipsters on Twitter or Tumblr.)

  • self: :watches white feminists argue with each other about radical vs. liberal feminist theory:
  • self: *returns to process of decolonizing and unlearning self-hatred, building and healing with other radical WoC/QPoC/PoC, practicing care and active empathy, creating homes and spaces to exist within the margins, and being unafraid to love ugliness and to love ourselves deeply*